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At en:Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester, they have its Latin name as "Dioecesis Roffensis". Should we use "Roffensis" for this article?Aulus Sergius Sulla 23:22, 15 Februarii 2012 (UTC)

Nice find! The English city of Rochester has the same Latin name, and has had it for a millennium. See also Ioannes Roffensis, the Latin name of John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester. So, I'd say, yes; but "Roffensis" is an adjective: we need to use the noun form and move this to Roffa (Novum Eboracum). Would others agree? Andrew Dalby (disputatio) 09:47, 16 Februarii 2012 (UTC)
Yes, and the same process applies to other places named for places that have well-attested Latin names. IacobusAmor 12:00, 16 Februarii 2012 (UTC)
Exactly: the Latin name isn't transferable unless, as in this case, a reliable source already has transferred it.
I've now cited a source and made the move. Andrew Dalby (disputatio) 12:57, 16 Februarii 2012 (UTC)
I wasn't sure, because Rochester, NY isn;t named after Rochester, Kent, but Nathaniel Rochester Aulus Sergius Sulla 15:18, 16 Februarii 2012 (UTC)
So is it Roffa, Roffae, Roffae, ect.? Aulus Sergius Sulla 15:21, 16 Februarii 2012 (UTC)
You're quite right -- about Nathaniel Rochester -- that's just the sort of problem that arises. But Catholic usage confirms that we're OK here.
Yes, it is -a -ae. If you click here you'll find a mention of "that very old manuscript, now conserved at Rochester", ex pervetusto illo codice, qui nunc Roffae servatur. That's the locative form, which is the same as the genitive in the first declension. Andrew Dalby (disputatio) 15:30, 16 Februarii 2012 (UTC)
Revertere ad "Roffa (Novum Eboracum)".