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"Noodles" in LatinRecensere

Thanks Jondel for the Latin name. :)

Actually my lexicon Norstedt (second and latest edition of 2009) says for "noodles" one word: collyra (f) (with no indication of where it should be stressed; it could either mean that it was forgotten, or that it should be stressed at the second to last syllable), and for "macaroni" two words: first cóllyra (f) (with the indication of stressing at the third to last syllable) and then pasta tubulata (f). So I was about to ask about the name for "noodles" in Latin. What does collyra mean, and how should it be stressed?

Donatello (disputatio) 14:09, 27 Augusti 2013 (UTC).

The stress is at the second syllable.e.g. collȳra. In my Traupman it means pasta, noodles, and macaroni. Pasta and macaranimacaroni are a form of dry noodles. Macaroni also has collyra and pasta tabulata (same as your dictionary? ).Jondel (disputatio) 15:15, 27 Augusti 2013 (UTC)
Revertere ad "Collyra".